GREATER SEDONA COMMUNITY PLAN 2018

GREATER SEDONA COMMUNITY PLAN

For SNAP Crisis Solutions

6/27/18

 

Hosted by Cornucopia Community Advocates

Harvey Grady President/CEO

 

This community emergency food assistance plan involves a review of current resources and their combined service capacity that needs to expand to feed an estimated extra 330 SNAP terminees, with terminations likely to begin October 2018.

Sedona has 505 participants in SNAP, VOC has 233, totaling 738 SNAP participants for the Greater Sedona area. Congressional debate on the SNAP portion of the Farm Bill is not yet resolved, yet severe cuts to SNAP are likely.

It is likely that severe federal budget reductions of SNAP and USDA toughening of eligibility requirements will lead to the termination of 35% to 45% of current SNAP participants.

Individuals and families terminated from SNAP will face an immediate need for local emergency food.

We focus on taking action steps that contribute to service capacity expansion and community support for the six emergency food providers in Sedona and the Village of Oak Creek.

The update below is intended to inform all of the engaged persons and organizations of progress achieved, unaddressed needs, and new situations that require discussion and/or collaboration.

This community effort seeks to inform and engage local officials, community leaders, the faith community, civic clubs, and funding sources in working together effectively to feed the hungry in the Greater Sedona area.

 

JUNE 27, 2018 UPDATE

 

The Greater Sedona community goal is to expand emergency food service capacity to feed up to an estimated 330 persons terminated from SNAP.  These six emergency food providers have shared the following numbers.

 

Organization                                                 Now Serves              Can Serve More Persons

Sedona Community Food Bank                            1,367                          50

St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry                              150                            0

Sedona Community Center                                        70                          15

Sedona Community Supper                                       50                          50

Verde Valley Caregivers                                           700                          50

Church of the Nazarene Mobile Food Pantry          40                          40

Total:                                      2,377                        205

 

On May 11th, 2018 the network indicated that it can serve 205 extra clients, which leaves a gap of 125 food insecure persons – children, adults, and seniors. This update presents an overview of progress in closing that gap.

 

PROGRESS

 

Ray West, director of the Saint Vincent de Paul Food Pantry (SVP) at St. John Vianney church in West Sedona signed a contract with St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance (SMFBA) to receive weekly shipments of donated food starting in July. Ceara Chirovsky of SMFBA managed that food resource connection. Since deliveries have not yet taken place, Ray cannot estimate the number of extra persons that SVP can feed.

 

Cathleen Healy-Baiza, director of Sedona Community Food Bank (SCFB), made available additional food storage space to SVP to accommodate additional food from SMFBA. She is exploring options for finding additional workspace that would increase the capacity of SCFB to serve more clients.

 

Brenda Redel, director of the Sedona Community Center (SCC) said that she is willing to host a mobile food pantry once a month. Harvey asked Mike Newcomb, Director of Manzanita Outreach, to contact Brenda about offering that program. Brenda notes that SCC serves the only hot, prepared meal service for homebound seniors and persons with disabilities in the Greater Sedona area. SCC’s Vital Food Service includes the Sedona Meals on Wheels and Community Lunch for seniors age 60 plus. Lunch is served at noon Monday through Friday. No one will be turned away hungry. Meals on Wheels serves 70 persons and can be extended to serve 15 persons more.

 

Jim Hose, director of the Sedona Community Supper (SCS) said that he will explore options for increasing the number of food insecure persons receiving hot meals on Monday nights. With cooperation from meal sponsors, SCS could serve up to 100 persons on Monday evenings, extending meals to an additional 50 persons. He needs a new commercial stove and more volunteers in the summer due to vacations.

 

Kent Ellsworth, Director of Verde Valley Caregivers (VVC), will contact St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance to consider distributing senior commodity food boxes in the Greater Sedona area. He needs to address needs for food storage and delivery to clients unable to drive. VVC receives 10 – 15 new clients a week, adding to the 700 clients it serves in the Greater Sedona area.

 

Sedona Mayor Sandy Moriarty added the Yavapai County Emergency Food Resource Directory 2018 to the City of Sedona website to make it available to the public. The link is located by opening the website http://www.sedonaaz.gov and entering “Cornucopia” into the search box.

 

Pastor Jim Cunningham of the Church of the Nazarene in VOC said that the Mobile Food Pantry from Manzanita Outreach is serving 40 persons and could serve 40 extra persons. Mike Newcomb of Manzanita Outreach stated his willingness to serve other sites in the Greater Sedona area that are distant from existing food providers.

 

Tracey McConnell of the Arizona Community Foundation of Sedona is willing to assist emergency food providers in applying for ACF grants and collaborations.

 

Harvey Grady notifies Cornucopia’s planning partners that the Association of Arizona Food Banks (AAFB) will offer grants up to $10,000 to emergency food providers in the state to assist them in feeding extra persons terminated from SNAP. Cornucopia plans on applying for a collaborative grant to aid emergency food providers able to present definite cost estimates.

 

LIST OF ACTION STEPS

 

These pending action steps are “reminders” to persons who committed their assistance to accomplishing expansion of emergency food service expansion in Greater Sedona.

 

 

ACCOMPLISHED

 

  • Harvey Grady of Cornucopia will produce a draft community plan and send it to participants for corrections and clarifications.
  • Ceara Chirovsky of SMFBA offered the option of supplying fresh produce and other foods to SVDP Food Pantry.
  • Patrice Isham of Cornucopia has compiled and distributed the 2018 Yavapai County Food Resource Directory to the Sedona Public Library and other public libraries in Yavapai County.

 

IN PROGRESS

 

  • Leslie Fox, Cornucopia Food Recovery Coordinator, will explore options for use of certified kitchen at the Sedona Center of Yavapai College for the Sedona Community Center and other events for feeding food insecure persons.
  • Tracy McConnell of ACF-Sedona offered to assist the SVDP Food Pantry in applying for an ACF-Sedona grant or linking with other resources.
  • Cornucopia will develop public information material that states the actual cost of meals to participants served by the Sedona Community Supper.
  • Harvey Grady will explore options for establishing a food storage center for use by Verde Valley Caregivers and other emergency food providers in Sedona.
  • Harvey Grady will inform the Sedona Chamber of Commerce about the SNAP crisis and its impact on local food sales and explore options for supporting the emergency food network.
  • Harvey Grady will talk to Kris Kazian, Sedona Fire District Chief, to discuss the feasibility of establishing emergency food pantries in fire stations.
  • Leslie Fox will contact Keep Sedona Beautiful, Sedona Garden Club, and Gardens for Humanity for fruit tree gleaning.
  • Harvey Grady will explore with the City of Sedona the possibility of designating a business parking lot in Sedona as a safe overnight parking site for homeless persons living in their cars.
  • Cornucopia will explore options for providing more publicity for emergency food providers in Sedona and VOC.

 

With Donna’s resignation from Cornucopia, the Community Emergency Food Plan needs resource persons with publicity and fundraising skills to fill the gap that Donna leaves. We ask our planning partners to recruit one or more volunteers to support the Plan’s accomplishments in those areas of expertise.

 

FARM BILL AND SNAP UPDATE

 

SNAP funding is contained in the Farm Bill that needs renewal every five years. Both houses of Congress pass their budgets, eligibility requirements, and policy directives to USDA in separate bills.

The House bill failed to pass the vote of the entire House in May, largely due to its severe budget cuts and large reductions in benefits. It would have eliminated or reduced food assistance for more than 1 million low-income households with more than 2 million persons.

The Senate bill was supportive of SNAP by maintaining funding levels, strengthening the relationship between employers and SNAP employment and training, improving SNAP technology, and investing in improved nutrition for SNAP participants. The Senate bill awaits a full Senate vote.

Last week, the House of Representatives passed its earlier bill by a margin of two votes, which means that the conference committee will seek a composite bill with budget cuts and benefit restrictions imposed by the House version.

The next meeting of the Greater Sedona Emergency Food Network is scheduled on Friday, August 10th, 9 – 11 am at the Sedona City Hall Vultee Room.

 

INITIAL COMMUNITY MEETING

 

Date:              May 11, 2018, 9 am – noon

Location:       Sedona City Hall – Vultee Room

 

Invited Attendees:

  • Vincent de Paul Food Pantry – Ray West and Maureen Koza
  • Sedona Community Center – Brenda Redel
  • Sedona Community Supper – Jim Hose
  • Verde Valley Caregivers – Kent Ellsworth
  • Cornucopia Food Recovery – Leslie Fox
  • Mary’s Food Bank Alliance – Ceara Chirovsky
  • City of Sedona – Mayor Sandy Moriarty
  • Big Park Coordinating Council – Rebecca Miller
  • Sedona Village Rotary Club – Rebecca Miller
  • Arizona Community Foundation of Sedona -Tracey McConnell
  • Arizona Food Marketing Alliance – Tim Thomas
  • Yavapai County Community Health Services – Heather Klomparens and Cecil Newell

 

Invited Absentees:

  • Sedona Community Food Bank – Cathleen Healy-Baiza
  • Church of the Nazarene – Rev. Jim Cunningham
  • Yavapai Food Council – Amy Aossey
  • United Way of Yavapai County – Annette Olson
  • Rotary Club of Sedona – Dave Young
  • Area Agency on Aging, NACOG – Mary Beals-Luedtka

Purpose

 

Harvey Grady welcomed everyone and stated the purpose of the meeting as developing a “Greater Sedona Community Plan for SNAP Crisis Solutions” by engaging emergency food providers with community resources.

Sedona and VOC have six emergency food resources, including:

  • Sedona Community Food Bank
  • Vincent de Paul Food Pantry
  • Sedona Community Center
  • Sedona Community Supper
  • Verde Valley Caregivers
  • Church of the Nazarene in VOC.

 

These nonprofit organizations offer emergency food from local, state, and federal sources to persons who register to receive food as individuals or families. Each organization operates with its own set of policies and procedures.

 

They are supported by five organizations that supply food to the emergency food providers, including:

  • Yavapai County Community Health Services
  • Yavapai Food Council
  • Cornucopia Food Recovery Program
  • Manzanita Outreach Mobile Food Pantry
  • Mary’s Food Bank Alliance
  • Area Agency on Aging, NACOG.

 

Together, these 12 organizations comprise the emergency food network for Sedona and VOC and beyond. Each organization is challenged with being able to feed a portion of an estimated 250 to 330 persons terminated from SNAP beginning October 2018.

SNAP Crisis – The Challenge

 

Sedona has 505 participants in SNAP, VOC has 233, totaling 738 SNAP participants for the Greater Sedona area. Federal budget cuts and more restrictive eligibility requirements are likely to disqualify 35% to 45% of current SNAP participants. Our estimate of SNAP terminations is based on SNAP reports made by the Arizona Department of Economic Security.

 

The USDA administers federal food assistance programs and is in the process of implementing budget cuts and policies to reduce SNAP participants despite the continued increase in food insecurity, as evidenced by lengthening waiting lines at food banks and pantries, hot meals programs, senior centers, etc.

 

Congressional battles are now focused on passage of the Farm Bill that contains appropriations for SNAP and other food assistance programs. When the Farm Bill is passed, the USDA will clarify its budget and program alterations. At present, the public can only estimate the degree of impact on local communities.

 

According to the Hunger Advisory Council to DES, it is likely that one-third of SNAP participants will be unable to meet stricter work requirements imposed by the USDA, disqualifying 300,000 Arizonans from receiving SNAP benefits.

 

Small rural communities, such as Sedona and VOC, mainly offer low-wage jobs that do not lift workers above poverty. In Arizona, 46% of households are considered as financially insecure, where a household lives from paycheck to paycheck in debt without savings. The “working poor” residents of Greater Sedona struggle to make a livable wage and are financially vulnerable, along with retired seniors on fixed incomes, and disabled persons unable to work.

 

SNAP terminations are likely to start in October 2018 with the new federal fiscal year. The USDA has not revealed if they will happen at once or over several months. Our challenge is to prepare for these terminations by expanding the service capacity of our six emergency food providers and our six supportive food supply organizations.

 

In facing the need to feed up to 330 food insecure person likely to be dropped from SNAP beginning October 2018, the Greater Sedona community has an opportunity to support its emergency food providers by stepping up to furnish donations and volunteers to meet that goal.

 

Using Cornucopia’s recent 2018 Yavapai County Food Assistance Survey, we combine the six emergency food providers returns to identify the numbers of persons they currently serve and the additional persons they can serve:

 

Organization                                                 Now Serves              Can Serve More Persons

Sedona Community Food Bank                            1,367                          50

St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry                              150                            0

Sedona Community Center                                        70                          15

Sedona Community Supper                                       50                          50

Verde Valley Caregivers                                           700                          50

Church of the Nazarene Mobile Pantry                    40                          40

Total:                                      2,377                        205

 

The six emergency food providers say that they can manage to feed 185 additional clients. Their current plans fall short by 125 persons in feeding up to 330 persons likely to be dropped from SNAP. This service expansion amounts to a 7% increase in the number of food insecure clients currently served.

SNAP Solutions

 

The participants of the May 11th meeting at the Sedona City Hall engaged their creativity by sharing information about their programs and exploring options for expanding their ability to serve up to 330 extra persons discharged from SNAP.

 

Cornucopia recently conducted a 2018 Yavapai County Food Assistance Survey to identify all 65 food assistance programs in the county, describe their current services, and ascertain their needs for expanding their service capacity to address the SNAP crisis.

 

Our six Greater Sedona emergency food providers all participated in that survey, and their responses are included below in describing their current services and plans.

Emergency Food Providers

 

Sedona Community Food Bank – Cathleen Healy-Baiza

Harvey Grady presented information about this emergency food provider.

  • It is located at the Seventh Day Adventist Church on Sunset Drive in West Sedona and is designated by a single sidewalk sign on Wednesday mornings and afternoons.
  • It acts as the primary emergency food provider for Greater Sedona, stating that it serves1,367 persons.
  • It is the only food provider open after work hours from 4 – 6 pm to offer the working poor emergency food.
  • It cannot open for an extra day, but could serve 50 extra persons in its current mode of operation.
  • It has two paid staff positions and 118 volunteers.
  • It uses the old model of handing out pre-packed food boxes.
  • It needs more food to feed persons dropped from SNAP.
  • It needs an additional refrigerator and freezer.
  • It receives food from public donations and the Yavapai Food Council’s bimonthly Food Neighbors (green bag) project.
  • It prefers money donations so that It can purchase food from local grocery stores.
  • It has outgrown its workspace in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

 

Sedona St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry – Ray West and Maurine Koza

  • This chapter of St. Vincent de Paul is located at St. John Vianney Catholic Church in West Sedona.
  • Its food pantry is located in the church parking lot and offers limited food storage.
  • It is supported by money donations from parishioners.
  • It receives bimonthly food from the Yavapai Food Council’s Food Neighbors project.
  • It shares refrigerator storage with the Sedona Community Food Bank.
  • It serves about 50 families totaling 150 persons, but cannot serve additional persons without more food and storage space.
  • It cannot open for an extra day.
  • It has no paid staff and relies on 30 active volunteers.
  • It uses the new model of client food choice (shopping for food).
  • It emphasizes client dignity, and serves fruit juice and water drinks to clients as they wait.
  • Its most requested items include fresh produce and personal hygiene products.
  • It also offers social services and emergency financial aid.

 

Sedona Community Center – Brenda Redel

  • It is located in West Sedona in the low-income Harmony neighborhood accessible to retired seniors.
  • It is funded by community donations, the Area Agency on Aging in NACOG, and a service contract with the City of Sedona.
  • It offers a community center for seniors age 60 and older, including congregate meals, social activities, and Meals on Wheels.
  • It serves 70 persons and can serve 15 additional persons.
  • It cannot open for an extra day, but can host a mobile pop-up food pantry once a month with a partner organization that brings food there.
  • It is open Monday through Friday each week 11 am – 12:30 pm.
  • It has 100 volunteers and serves congregate meals to about 100 seniors each day. Nobody gets turned away hungry.
  • It has 4 paid staff.
  • It needs weekend meals drivers to deliver meals to the homebound.

 

Sedona Community Supper – Jim Hose

  • It offers hot meals weekly on Monday evening 5 – 6 pm at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in West Sedona.

 

  • It serves an average of 50 – 75 persons, with a peak of 125 persons during the winter holidays.
  • In a year, it serves 1,300 meals averaging $1.50 cost per meal.
  • It can serve an additional 50 persons per meal and extend its available time from one to two hours.
  • The church has a certified kitchen with limited food storage space and no walk-in cooler.
  • It needs a new commercial stove priced at $2,000.
  • It has about 45 volunteers from several service clubs that rotate each week and bring food for the dinner.
  • It has six sponsors, including Sedona Community Food Bank, Wildflower, and Sedona Bakery.
  • It needs more food, volunteers, equipment, and workspace
  • It offers a feeling of community and safety to clients.
  • It needs help in correcting a rumor that the cost of the meal is too expensive for clients.

 

VOC Church of the Nazarene Mobile Food Pantry – Pastor Jim Cunningham

  • Manzanita Outreach of Cottonwood delivers a mobile food pantry to the Church of the Nazarene on Rojo Road in the southernmost portion of VOC.
  • The church offers food in its parking lot on the second and fourth Tuesdays 9 – 10 am.
  • It publicizes that “free food” is available with announcements, articles in the weekly VOC newspapers, and a road sign.
  • It serves up to 40 persons weekly and has the potential for serving an additional 40 persons.

 

Verde Valley Caregivers – Kent Ellsworth

  • It is located in an Uptown Sedona office.
  • It has 370 volunteers who make home visits to elderly, disabled, and homebound persons in the Verde Valley.
  • It serves 2,200 persons, with 700 living in Sedona and VOC.
  • It offers a social service assessment of needs, including food insecurity, transportation, health and social services.
  • It lacks storage space for food to be delivered to clients.

 

Yavapai County Community Health Services – Heather Klomparens

  • Nancy Gottschalk of Cottonwood is developing a gleaning program with Leslie Fox of Cornucopia’s Food Recovery program in rescuing fruit and nuts from private and commercial properties.
  • Double bucks program for SNAP participants – trying to get farmers markets in the Verde Valley to accept the SNAP card for doubling the amount of fresh produce purchases by SNAP participants.
  • Staff offers school wellness and health education programs in Sedona and VOC.
  • Develops school health and safety policies and plans and reward school healthy food efforts.
  • Operates the WIC (Women, Infants and Children) benefit program for pregnant women and mothers with children under age 5.
  • 70% of West Sedona School students receive meal assistance.
  • Encourages school gardens and clubs.
  • County policy does not allow compost piles at schools.
  • Encourages community gardens.
  • Monitors fresh produce commercial markets.

 

Yavapai Food Council – Harvey Grady

  • Its green bag Food Neighbors program raises an average of 2,800 meals in Sedona and 4,400 meals in VOC for immediate free distribution to local emergency food providers on a bimonthly schedule.
  • Its school student weekend meals program supplies West Sedona School and Big Park Community School throughout the school year in collaboration with the Sedona Community Food Bank and Verde Valley School.
  • Its Bountiful Kitchen program caters school breakfast and lunch meals to charter schools and child care centers in the Verde Valley.
  • It offers summer meal programs at a number of community and school sites in the Verde Valley.

 

Cornucopia Food Recovery Program – Leslie Fox

  • It has been operating for nine months and has delivered more than 60,000 meals to emergency food providers and residential programs feeding food insecure persons in the Verde Valley.
  • It has diverted more than 77,000 pounds of inedible food from the landfill into compost piles.
  • Its plan is to develop community compost piles in Verde Valley communities for use by residents for home and community gardens.
  • It focused initially on low-income communities including Camp Verde and Cottonwood and is ready to serve Sedona and VOC.
  • Leslie interviews an emergency food programs or residential programs to identify the foods they need, then locates a food source willing to donate excess foods, establishing a food link between source and recipient.

 

Manzanita Outreach – Mike Newcomb

  • It is a local nonprofit located in Cottonwood that is a chapter of Kids Against Hunger, an international emergency food distributor.
  • Mike Newcomb is the director.
  • It recently established an agreement with SMFBA to act as a mobile food pantry that receives emergency food and transports it to selected locations for public consumption.
  • It currently distributes emergency food two days a month to Clarkdale, Verde Village, Cornville, and VOC.
  • It delivers food directly to persons who come for food.

 

St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance (SMFBA) – Ceara Chirovsky (Flagstaff)

  • On contract with DES, SMFBA distributes emergency food to a portion of the Phoenix metropolitan area and to Northern Arizona counties and Indian reservations.
  • It makes weekly food deliveries to almost all emergency food providers in Yavapai County.
  • For decades, it has acted as the major supplier of emergency food to local providers in Northern Arizona.
  • It does not currently deliver food to emergency food providers in Sedona and VOC.
  • Recently, SMFBA became responsible for delivering commodity boxes for seniors in Northern Arizona.
  • In Phoenix, it offers a Community Culinary Training program that might have value in the Verde Valley.
  • SMFBA is willing to explore emergency food delivery options with providers in Sedona and VOC.

 

Food Markets Alliance Arizona – Tim Thomas (Phoenix)

  • It represents grocery stores and farmers in Arizona.
  • It lobbies for governmental policies favorable to food retail interests.
  • It views federal budget cuts to SNAP as reductions in food store revenue.
  • Its Washington, DC, office advocates for continuation and expansion of SNAP and other food assistance programs for the food insecure.
  • It promotes zero waste policies for food stores, including composting.
  • In Sedona, 11 food stores will lose sales revenue when SNAP cutbacks occur.
  • Sedona and VOC annual SNAP food sales amount to $1.2 million, with a likely annual $500,000 loss in revenue when federal budget cuts reduce the number of persons on SNAP.
  • Any food stores operating on a slim profit margin will be stressed and might close.
  • The City of Sedona does not tax food sales, so it will not experience loss of revenue from a drop in food sales.

 

The City of Sedona – Mayor Sandy Moriarty

  • She supports the development of a community action plan to expand emergency food services to meet the SNAP crisis.
  • She recognizes the extent of food insecurity, even in the affluent communities of Sedona and VOC.
  • She is willing to consider emergency food service options where the City might be of assistance.
  • She needs to engage the City Manager and the City Council in taking action on behalf of the City.
  • She recommends that emergency food providers consider making grant requests to the City’s local nonprofit grant program that opens in February 2019.

 

Big Park Coordinating Council (VOC) – Rebecca Miller

  • The Big Park Coordinating Council represents the needs and interests of the Village of Oak Creek residents to Yavapai County.
  • It has been uninformed about food insecurity and emergency food providers.
  • Any emergency food providers or supportive services are welcome to make a presentation at monthly meetings.

 

Rotary Clubs of Sedona and VOC – Rebecca Miller

  • The two Rotary clubs in Sedona and the one in VOC are available to consider community service projects that support emergency food providers.
  • Other community groups, such as Kiwanis, Sedona Women, gardening clubs, etc., can be approached by emergency food providers seeking volunteers and donations.

 

Arizona Community Foundation – Sedona – Tracey McConnell

  • It has operated from Phoenix for 40 years and established regional offices throughout Arizona to expand philanthropic opportunities.
  • It has grown to be a $1 billion foundation.
  • Its endowment programs continue to expand and offer funding for worthy community projects.
  • Its Sedona office offers an annual grants program that next opens in March 2019.
  • In addition to grant funding, ACF-Sedona is able to help create collaborations of community services to increase public service.

 

Additional Resources

 

Northern Arizona Healthcare Foundation – representative unable to attend

  • It offers grant opportunities for health-related projects.
  • Its 2018 deadline for applications is June 15th.

 

USDA Rural Expansion – representative unable to attend

  • It offers a rolling grant cycle for different rural programs.
  • Its grants often require local matching funds.
  • Jeff Hay, Rural Development Coordinator, 928-759-9301 or hays@az.usda.gov .

 

Additional Action Steps

 

Build Community Support for Emergency Food Providers

  • We need someone to explore options for providing more publicity for emergency food providers in Sedona and VOC.
  • Harvey Grady will assist emergency food providers in preparing their grant applications.
  • The City of Sedona website has added a link to the 2018 Emergency Food Resource Directory on the Cornucopia website.
  • Patrice Isham has placed hard and electronic copies of the 2018 Emergency Food Resource Directory at the Sedona Library.

 

Provide Collaborative Community Fundraising for Emergency Food Providers

  • We need someone to explore sending direct mailers for emergency food providers that do not already do so.
  • We need someone to explore options for reviving the “Taste of Sedona” as a collaborative fundraising event.

 

Explore Miscellaneous Ideas

  • Bring Market on the Move to Sedona – need a sponsoring church with parking lot. Possibilities – Christ Lutheran Church, Jewish Community Center – need volunteers to manage food deliveries and sales once a month.
  • Harvey Grady will talk to Kris Kazian, Sedona Fire District Chief, to discuss the feasibility of establishing emergency food pantries in fire stations.
  • Cornucopia Food Recovery – Leslie Fox will contact Keep Sedona Beautiful, Sedona Garden Club, and Gardens for Humanity for fruit tree gleaning.
  • Harvey Grady will explore with the City of Sedona the possibility of designating a business parking lot in Sedona as a safe overnight parking site for homeless persons living in their cars.

 

Quarterly Meetings

 

The action steps listed above will be reviewed at quarterly meetings of the Greater Sedona Emergency Food Network. We’ll follow this regular process:

 

  1. Evaluate progress by reviewing organizational commitments to feed an additional 125 persons to achieve the goal of feeding up to 330 food insecure persons.

 

  1. Review options for expanding the service capacity of existing

 

  1. Review options for adding new

 

  1. Take further action steps as needed to improve community health and safety.

 

The next meeting of the Greater Sedona Emergency Food Network is scheduled on Friday, August 10th, 9 – 11 am at the Sedona City Hall

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